zeldathemes
A Case of the Hiccups
Hi! I'm Hiccup! On this blog, you can expect Doctor Who. Expect Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter and The Hunger Games. Expect oh-so-many Marvel comics and MCU posts. You can probably expect some Sherlock and the occasional Merlin. And expect books. Lots of books. All of the books.


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Boys With Wings

hdreadswebcomics:

Boys With Wings by E . C. Peterschmidt is simply lovely.  Recommended by a friend of a friend of the creator, I was amazed at how much attention to detail there is.  It’s not usual to see traditional media webcomics, but Boys With Wings looks like it’s all watercolored.

image

Set in a world of flying ships and dragons, it starts out exploring the tempestuous relationship between Lance Erroway, a flight commander who is clearly used to being obeyed and respected, and his ten-year-old daughter, Amelia, who is headstrong and not at all the kind of child Erroway would have wanted…if he’d wanted a child at all.

image

I love the borders and panels in this comic.  They are intricate, reminiscent of lockets and picture frames, and they lend a wonderfully Victorian air to this webcomic.  When Peterschmidt chooses not to use panels, though, it is equally lovely.

image

I’m very impressed with all of the technical skill apparent in this comic.  The visual storytelling is also phenomenal.

image

And of course, as a lifelong Miyazaki fan, I love any premise around flight.  It’s right there in the title; this will be a webcomic about aviation.  I’m excited to see where this story goes.  It’s a slower comic but the art and the promise of what’s to come seem well-worth the wait.

  #hd reads webcomics    #webcomics    #webcomics you should read    #boys with wings  
thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photoSill Level: Beginner
Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.
The Basics
You camera has a sensor.

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 
Aperture
The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.
Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.
A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 
A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 
Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.
Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.
Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 
Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.
There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 
ISO
ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.
Getting the Balance
A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.
To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 
To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 
If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 
Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 
TL;DR
Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
Not enough light = underexposed
Too much light = overexposed
Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
A large hole is a small f-stop
A small hole is a large f-stop
A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
ISO is the amplification of the sensor
HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result
Photos by Froggie
You can find me here: [tumblr | wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.
If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photo
Sill Level: Beginner

Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.

The Basics

You camera has a sensor.

image

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

image

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 

Aperture

The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

image

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.

Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

image

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.

A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 

A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

image

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.

Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.

Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 

Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

image

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

image

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.

There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 

ISO

ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

image

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.

Getting the Balance

A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.

To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 

To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 

If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 

Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 

TL;DR

  • Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
  • Not enough light = underexposed
  • Too much light = overexposed
  • Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
  • A large hole is a small f-stop
  • A small hole is a large f-stop
  • A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
  • A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
  • A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
  • A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
  • ISO is the amplification of the sensor
  • HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
  • LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result

Photos by Froggie

You can find me here: [tumblr wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.

If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

  #photography  

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

simhasanam:

quantumblog:

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have?

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s curriculum for the first few years because calculus hadn’t been discovered yet.

Two empires [Roman & Ottoman] spanned the entire gap from Jesus to Babe Ruth.

When the pyramids were being built, there were still woolly mammoths.

The last use of the guillotine was in France the same year Star Wars came out.

Oxford University was over 300 years old when the Aztec Empire was founded.

When pilgrims were landing on Plymouth Rock, you could already visit what is now Santa Fe, New Mexico to stay at a hotel, eat at a restaurant and buy Native American silver.

The first wagon train of the Oregon Trail heads out the same year the fax machine is invented.

Nintendo was formed the same year Van Gogh painted Starry Night.

Cleopatra (the last Pharaoh of Egypt) lived closer to the moon landings than she did to the building of the Pyramids of Giza.

When Kublai Khan became the Mongol Emperor, the first humans were setting foot on New Zealand.

  #history things    #MLK and Anne Frank were born in the same year    #that's my contribution to this post    #this is super rad  

make me choose → asked by amywilliems
↳ oswin oswald or victorian clara?

  #god i wanted oswin to come back so badly    #and she sort of did    #but not as oswin    #i need more oswin    #oswin oswald    #doctor who  
And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.
  #inequality    #economics    #important things  
cleverestvoice:

"Void stuff."

cleverestvoice:

"Void stuff."

  #check it out!    #cleverestvoice    #doctor who    #david tennant  

Bucky Barnes and dating in the 40’s.

buckycamehome:

So, wow.  Yeah.  Another one of those “I’ve been reading a lot of.. and.. (insert my opinion here).”

So, yes,  I keep reading about Bucky as the ladies man: all sexed up and such.  It’s a bit baffling to me, as this is a very modern way of thinking.  Dating - or courtship - was very different in the 30’s and 40’s than it is today!

For example, take this excerpt from A Brief History of Courtship and Dating in America, (Part 2):

Beth Bailey and Ken Myers explain in the Mars Hill Audio ReportWandering Toward the Altar: The Decline of American Courtship, before World War II, American youth prized what Bailey calls a promiscuous popularity, demonstrated through the number and variety of dates a young adult could command, sometimes even on the same night.

In the late 1940s, Margaret Mead, in describing this pre-war dating system, argued that dating was not about sex or marriage. Instead, it was a “competitive game,” a way for girls and boys to demonstrate their popularity.

This describes a situation in which dating was more about one’s reputation than any sort of romance.  It was very important not only to be seen with many dates, but with the proper people.  This explains why Steve would have had such a difficult time securing a partner: being seen with someone unpopular was worse than not being seen at all.  However, this gives us a clue as to how popular Bucky must have been!  If he was able to leverage himself in order to get Steve dates, Bucky must have been pretty high-ranking on the dating scale.

For men, desirable dating traits included a good personality and dance skills, as well as being “tactful, amusing, well dressed, prompt, and courteous” (Great Depression and the Middle Class…).  Lasciviousness was not a good quality!  Women communicated with one another concerning a man’s suitability, so for Bucky to have been popular he couldn’t have been the sex-centric playboy that fans like to imagine.  It’s far more likely that he was well-spoken, funny, charming, and a great dancer.  Remember, Bucky was from the lower classes, so he wouldn’t have had the money - despite the Depression, it was expected that men pay for the entire date (barring Sadie Hawkins themed events and once a couple started to go steady) - to impress women with a car and fancy clothes, nor would he have been able to take them out to dinner, so his dance skills would have been pretty important!  

In fact, dancing was such a popular form of entertainment that, in one year, the University of Michigan fraternities held over 300 evening dances!

According to this web page “young people in the 1930s dated and double-dated by going to movies, getting something to eat, going for ice cream, driving around, spending time with friends, going to dances, and even ‘necking.’”  That’s right folks, necking.  Not fucking.  

image

Women were expected to straddle a fine line between being too forward or too “frigid,” both of which could harm their reputations.  Young people engaged in kissing, necking, and petting (meaning anything short of full intercourse).  Petting was becoming more common - due, in part, to rising automobile-culture - as was sex itself; heavier petting typically came from going-steady, and engagement “came… to mean that partners would at some point ‘go all the way’” (Teen Culture in the 1930’s).  Ladies who were known to be free with their sexuality prior to commitment were in danger of being known for exactly that, and could easily become popular merely as a means to an end (the wrong kind of popularity).

So, it likely wouldn’t have been hard for Bucky, as a popular young man, to find a willing partner (and I’m certainly not suggesting that he was virginal).  However, if he were the sort of man to focus on easy women, it’s not likely that he would maintain his own high rating (which, again, we can guess at by the fact that he was able to not only secure himself dates, but Steve as well).  

This is a really quick and dirty run-down of dating and sex during the 30’s into the early 40’s, but there is a lot of information available out there.  Bucky is presented as a stand-up guy, so I don’t really understand why so many people seem to view him as some sort of a man whore.  I sincerely doubt that he was entirely chaste (particularly once he went into the Army, a topic which I avoided on purpose), but I imagine that he was a desirable companion for his charm and dateability far more than for his sexual prowess.

  #captain america    #history things    #bucky barnes  

loudst:

arspooktzka:

i don’t trust asexuals because their brains are not distracted by the matters of the flesh.

where is all that brain power going.

i bet it’s going to the overmind, where they are gathering strength to consolidate their hold over the world

image

you know too much.

  #i laughed    #asexuality  

cypher2:

ESPN Films and ESPN W | Nine for IX “Branded” | for saveitlikesolo

I think without question women who aspire to be athletes, who want to play sports, are better off today than they were thirty years ago. I think it really encouraged young girls to go out there and aspire to their dreams and try to reach their goals. 

But despite Title IX, women have really gained very little at the professional sports level over time. 

It’s a cultural issue. It’s not just a women in sport issue. As a culture we have to look at all of the messages we send out on a daily basis about what we think is important. I think we’ve made a lot of progress. But I think we have a lot of progress to make.

  #feminism    #badass ladies    #important things    #sports  
aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

  #film    #photography    #this is super rad!